[EN-BT15] Tamakii: Runner up OCE Regional with MegaGargomon Green

Introduction

Hey everyone, I’m Tamakii, but some of you may know me as Rhys. I’m a player from Victoria, Australia who recently traveled to Sydney March Regionals 2024 and had one of the best runs of my life, placing 2nd with none other than our favorite rabbit/dog, Terriermon.

A little about myself. I have been playing card games for over 10 years, and have dabbled in a large number of card games. Some include Yugioh, MtG, Pokemon, Force of Will and Weiss Schwarz to name a few. Back in 2022 I picked up Digimon around BT7, not long before BT8 and immediately fell in love. I grew up watching Digimon, preferring it over other popular series at the time, poured hours upon hours into the Dusk and Dawn 3ds games, and have a love for Terriermon that has yet to waver.

My first competitive deck was Alphamon during BT8 and BT9, netting me a great understanding of how both stacks and compulsory effects work, as well as how destructive a digimon that swings multiple times can be. I stopped playing towards the end of BT9, just before BT10 due to my LGS moving away from Digimon. I then picked it back up after BT14’s release, where after a few games with my Alpha, I knew it was time to move on. I ended up building Shinegreymon, which was my next deck I thoroughly enjoyed. But the moment I was made aware of the Terrier structure deck, I knew what I had to do. I then spent the next few months collecting every card I could find that was either Terriermon related or adjacent.

The time finally came and I got my hands on the Double Typhoon Advanced Structure Deck, which meant it was time to start cooking in the lab.

Deck Profile

The idea of the deck is to be aggressive with your golden Rapidmons while keeping a tight grip on the opponent’s board. Although I’m only running 8 level 4s and 4 level 5s, with 14 pieces of search that hit all of my level 4s up to my level 6s, there is very rarely a consistency issue.

Some interesting things you might notice are:

    • 1x ST17 Lopmon: This was included to assist with the aggressive gameplan. Between ST17 Terriermon and Double Typhoon, we have ways to cheat out the Lopmon and give one of our Rapidmons a cheeky extra check. It also is a good game ender if you can use it with Megagargomon’s ability to unsuspend after its first attack.
    • Omnimon: Merciful Mode: An incredibly helpful tool in both the Leviamon and Numemon matchup, as well as any deck that interacts with the trash. Deleting a big problem digimon, then putting cards back to the bottom of their deck to prevent on deletion effects from triggering in itself is huge, but then it forces itself to de-digivolve to trash the top card of the opponent’s security. On top of being a 15k beater, this is an incredibly powerful card.
    • DeathXmon: DeathXmon is a powerhouse that almost every deck can run 1 of without worry. Being able to play a level 7 from hand for potentially free, it’s just a giant board wipe. It also can be pesky for certain decks to deal with, so it’s a 15k beater that forces them to delete their lowest  play cost every turn.
    • Quartzmon: It wouldn’t be a green deck without a Quartzmon. A very powerful mid to late game control tool, but also as deadly in security. A staple boss monster most green decks should run one of.
  • Fire Rocket: This choice turned heads. A red card in a green/yellow/black deck? Crazy! Of course, as long as you have a golden Rapidmon out, due to it’s armor form attribute, you can ignore the color requirement for the card. Giving a digimon with 2 colors sec attack +1, another great aggressive tool. Also very good for memory choking, if you really don’t want to give your opponent more than 1 memory, this is a good way to do so. And finally, if checked in security, delete a blocker. This can be useful against a number of decks in the current meta, and has flipped games on their head for me before. Definitely my kind of spice.
  • 1 Mimi and 1 Henry: My choice in playing one of each of the memory setters seems to have been a topic of discussion. Mimi is my preferred option,, being able to “Win more” by either pushing up an egg hatched this turn,, or hatch another egg for next turn really helps with the aggressive gameplan. However, Mimi cannot be searched by the EX4 Terriermons, so I decided to swap to 1 Henry as a backup that can be searched. Plus the extra suspend never goes astray.

General Game Plan:

Click into the image for decklist in digimonmeta.com

The general game plan for the deck is ideally you want to have a hand that kind of looks something like this:

ST17 Terriermon, BT8 Willis, A Terriermon, A Rapidmon, A searcher.

Turn 1: Digi into the ST17 Terrier in raising, then play your searcher.

Turn 2: Raise Terriermon, Play Willis for 1 memory, hatch, digi other terrier, digivolve terrier in play into rapid.

This is the ideal first 2 turns. If your searcher is an Agility Training you can keep turn and swing, or you may choose to pass them to 1, it’s entirely situation based.

Here are something to keep in mind:

– Slamming a level 5 Rapidmon isn’t a bad thing, as long as it gets protection and you’re not against dp reduction. It creates a body that is fairly difficult to remove, and gives an opportunity to blast, slowing them down, and giving a potential body to go to level 7 during your next turn.

– There’s nothing wrong with swinging a golden Rapidmon, armor purging, then digivolving on top of that level 3 again.

– If you armor purge back to the ST17 Terriermon, as long as you haven’t done it this turn you can activate the Terriermon’s effect. Even though it started the turn as a rapid, or you digivolved over it.

Regionals Sydney

A little story, I decided to drive myself and my training partner to the Regionals in Sydney, which is close to 1000 km or 620 miles for those not using metric.

This was my first time ever driving further than an hour away, and it was intense. What it did give me was 2 days in the car to theorize and memorize my deck in and out. While driving my friend and I discussed different decks in the meta, and how we would overcome them. It honestly helped a lot, as it was time dedicated to just thinking about how the game plays, not necessarily getting caught up in the game in front of me.

Now, for how the actual games went!

Round 1: Leomon 2-1

A fairly standard Leomon list, and a good pilot. First game of the day, and there were performance anxiety issues going in, but after a couple of deep breaths, the game plan was set.

Leomon is fairly easy to manage provided you get a tamer on the board.

First you want to put them in a position where they are going to pass turn on a level 5. Grapleo or Loaderleo doesn’t matter.

You then want to digivolve into BT8 Rapid, -5kDP their Level 5, then digivolve into your level 5 Rapidmon, forcing a de-digivolve which will immediately die as both Liallmon and Leomon are 5kDP. After that you take the aggro gameplan, and if they manage to get a HeavyLeo or BanchoLeo out, Giant missile is your best friend.

Round 2: Numemon 2-1

The new kid on the block, Numemon sat across from me for round 2. This is a matchup I was not looking forward to, with not a lot of experience and horror stories from other players.

However, once in the game, I found it rather playable. The Monzaemons can be scary, but as long as you focus on board control first, then aggro after, you will be fine.

DeathXmon, BT8 Rapidmon, Heaven’s Judgement and of course level 5 Rapidmon all put in a lot of work for this matchup.

Round 3: Leviamon 2-0

Levia was originally a match up I dreaded, but after a lot of practice with a friend from locals, I felt as confident as I could going in, and it definitely wasn’t overconfidence. Without question Leviamon is defeated by the level 5 Rapidmon. All you need to do is ensure you get at least 1 tamer on the board, and from there, the Levia player cannot do anything. Omnimon Merciful Mode is also an incredible tool mid to late game to prevent them from using biting crush to swarm their board with crocodiles.

Round 4: Leviamon 2-1

This was a very unfortunate round, as I won on a technicality and I felt really bad for my opponent. We both won a game and were in the midst of game 3 when time was called. However, due to both of us being deep in the think tank, neither of us recorded the turn 0. Due to this, we had a differing opinion on who was turn 0. If he was correct, the match was a draw, if I was correct, the match was a win, as I believed I was turn 3, and I had an immediate swing for the game.
It was ruled that due to no record of turn 0, the game was considered complete with my win as it was within the 5 minutes over time.

As for the actual games, an incredibly skilled player, playing against him felt like an epic fight, two titanic goliaths crashing against each other in a display of sheer force of will.

Round 5: Leviamon 2-1

I was so very glad and grateful to my local Leviamon player for when I sat down across from my 3rd Levia player in a row, you know I let out a great big sigh.

Once again, level 5 Rapidmon, Omnimon MM and just board control followed by aggro, it’s a pretty straight forward game plan.

Round 6: Fanglongmon Ukko Build 0-2

By this point I was starting to cause a commotion. Rapidmon on the top tables, currently undefeated. A number of people were flocking to my table the moment they could to give words of encouragement or just see whether it was true or exaggerated.
However, I went into this match up completely blind, having never played against a single Fanglong deck before, let alone the Ukko build.

I realized very quickly that my usual game plan didn’t fit the bill here, and I had to think on my feet, but by the time I started getting a rhythm in game 1, he was already well and truly setup.

Game 2 ended quickly as I was met with a rare brick, missing out on a large number of my rapidmons.

Disappointed, but 5-1 was nothing to scoff at.

Round 7 Magnamon Armour 2-1

The final round came about, and I could definitely feel an amount of pressure off my shoulders now that I wasn’t going into the final round to fight for first place. Faced against another deck I haven’t really fought before, I made sure to observe, take my time and read the cards thoroughly.

But once again, the tools provided within this package were just so versatile and strong, that Magna couldn’t keep up. Being able to -DP, de-digivolve, bounce to deck, suspend, stun, prevent digivolution. The deck just has a bit of everything.

DeathXmon definitely came in clutch in at least 2 of the games where he tried to go wide, but was met with a swift de-digivolve your board, then delete all lv4s and lower.

Deck Strengths and Weaknesses

  • This deck has a lot of potential, and it only gets stronger with BT16. However, as it stands it has a few glaring weaknesses, many of which I thankfully avoided for the most part during my Regionals run. But before the bad news, lets start with the good news:

    Strengths

    • The deck is fast! Being that it mainly relies on its level 4s, you don’t need to worry about spending 2-3 turns in breeding, building a stack, you land on the ground running, and ideally don’t stop.
    • It has a very strong tempo playstyle. While being able to keep a healthy amount of aggression you can also keep a sturdy grip on board control, through the use of the different Rapidmons, among other tools within the kit.
    • Armor purge is your friend. When checking multiple checks with a golden Rapidmon, if they die on the first check, because of armor purge, the checks will continue despite technically losing the combat. This is what makes Fire Rocket so strong. Because although you’re likely sacrificing a rapid and terrier, you just took out 40% of their life.
    • Your top end is borderline unfair. Level 5 Rapidmon is so incredibly strong the moment you have a green tamer on the board. While the De-Digivolve 1 is unconditional, to then be unable to be deleted or bounced to hand or deck makes it the perfect conduit for a blast digivolve with MegaGargomon Ace, who is also incredibly powerful. Suspend 2 digimon/tamers. 2 targets cannot unsuspend or digivolve. It doesn’t need to be the same targets. Some deck’s worst nightmare.
    • Reliable search. Your terrier searchers will all find your line, so the deck can be fairly consistent, and it’s very rare to have anything miss a find.

Weaknesses

      • The deck just loses to DP minus. There’s no protection until BT16. So due to this, we are susceptible to decks like Yellow Vaccine, Mastemon and even Leomon and Numemon to some extent.
      • We are weak to de-digivolve. Another weakness where if they just keep us off Rapidmons through de-digivolve, we can’t really do anything other than scuffed rookie rush.
      • We’re tamer reliant. If we don’t hit a tamer early, it becomes a lot harder to keep up, as we need a tamer to draw, to suspend for DP minus, for protection. We just struggle without one.
      • 26 cards of this list are 7k dp or less. So we end up having a fairly weak security a lot of the time, so while we have up to 6 bombs for security, it’s rare to have more than 1 in there per game.

Conclusion

For my second large scale event, my plan going in was to make top 32. I just wanted to be in the top quarter of the event, but I never imagined that I would end up being the second person called up at the end of it all and to be met with such an uproarious cheer from the crowd for coming 2nd place with the silly bunny deck.

None of this would have been possible without all the support from my local friends, so here’s a little shout out to them all:
Thank you Jamie for your weird different way of observing the game makes me so much better at understanding and perceiving the game. Also thanks for the catch right before the event started.
Thank you Vince for supplying not only me but the whole community with cards, whether regular or alts!
Thank you to John for all the Levia match up practice! It came super in handy!

Thank you to the rest of the boys at Ozzie Collectables, Rhystic Study and Next Level Games!

If you have any questions, feel free to @ me in the Double Typhoon chat in the Digimon TCG discord server. It’s @Tamakii.

And finally, thank you to Digimon Meta for letting me write this article. I’m just a silly little guy from down under, but I’m really grateful that I get to share my experience and offer some advice for any aspiring Terriermon players out there.

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