Hello Colors

Overview

Digimons in the Digimon Card Game are broadly categorized into 6 colors: each indicating an affinity toward a particular play-style. 

The first 3 colors to be introduced were red, blue and yellow, in 54-card Japanese starter decks back in April 2020. When the first booster set [BT-01] New Evolution was released a month later, the forth color, green was introduced. By the release of the second booster [BT-02] Ultimate Power in July 2020, DCG added an black and violet into the game. The Japanese starter decks for green, black and violet are set to be released in November 2020.

Remarks: this guide provides only a generalization and is not a hard rule that applies to all digimons of that color.

Red: powerful and aggresive

Red decks usually setup into strong digimons with high DP and effects such as <DP+?> and <SecurityAttack+?>, allowing them to fearlessly and aggresively attack the (opponent’s) security pile. Red decks have access to destuctive digimon effects such as [BT1-23] SkullGreymon and [BT2-018] Volcanicdramon, as well as the powerful removal option card [ST1-16] Terra/Gaia Force. Due to aggressive nature of red decks, they are quite early-game oriented and is quite straightforward to play.

Aggresiveness
Defensiveness
Digivolution Speed
Play Complexity

Blue: focused on debuffing, disabling and rapid attacks.

Blue digimons have access to rather wide variety of effects. Many blue digimons can remove (your opponent’s) digivolution sources, immediately weakening digimons that rely on inherited effects. Some blue digimons such as [ST2-11] MetalGarurumon can unsuspend/unrest itself after attacking, allowing for either a secondary attack or protection into your opponent’s turn. In addition, blue decks also have access to cards that allow spawning new digimons from another’s digivolution sources, such as [BT1-044] MetalGarurumon and [ST1-15] Wolf Claw/Kaiser Nail, making them great candidates to swarm at your opponent. Being closer to a tempo deck, playing a blue deck would usually require some ad-hoc decision making and planning.
Aggresiveness
Defensiveness
Digivolution Speed
Play Complexity

Yellow: it's all about security defense and recovery

What yellow deck falls short in attacks, it makes up in recovery. With a plethora of digimons that has <Recovery+?>, yellow continuously recovers its security pile while gradually setting up big digimons to attack the opponent. [ST3-12] T.K. Takaishi can grant a permanent DP+2000 to (your) security digimons, while most of the angel-type digimons have effects that can recover the security pile. In addition, while yellow digimons do not have the raw DP firepower, they mostly do have effects that reduce an opponent digimon’s DP (an digimon whose DP falls to 0 will be deleted). Due to the control nature of yellow decks, they can be very difficult to play as most other aggresive decks can be very difficult to recover from.
Aggresiveness
Defensiveness
Digivolution Speed
Play Complexity

Green: efficient and fast digivolutions

Green digimons generally digivolve very quickly, and have access to effects that allow attacking digimons instead of the security. The Argomon line has the <Download-?> effect that allows digivolutions at virtually no cost (requires suspending/resting another digimon), while many other green digimons have relatively low digivolution costs. When they become big, they have access to effects that allow suspension/resting of the opponent’s digimon hence making them targetable for attacks. Some green digimons also have the <Piercing> effect allowing them to perform a security check whenever they destroy an opponent’s digimon. Green decks usually manage memory very efficiently, growing big fast while leaving very little memory for the opponent’s turn.
Aggresiveness
Defensiveness
Digivolution Speed
Play Complexity

Black: the great wall

Many black digimons have the and effects, making them effective both during the player’s turn and the opponent’s. Black digimons are mainly defensive in nature (due to ) but at their LV6 forms can become quite formidable. The effect protects against being an attack target during the opponent’s turn hence granting strong staying power on the field. In addition, black decks are also granted the effect that is as good as any removal effects when pitted against a wall of blocker digimons.
Aggresiveness
Defensiveness
Digivolution Speed
Play Complexity

Violet: rise from the graves

Most violet/purple digimons have access to effects that trigger when they are destroyed, and also effects that re-summons a digimon from the trash. These effects make violet decks very capable of swarming. In addition, some of them has the very formidable effect which will also take down the opponent’s digimon that destroyed them.
Aggresiveness
Defensiveness
Digivolution Speed
Play Complexity

White: unique

White became a core deck color starting BT-06 when Eosmon was introduced, which prior to that, was reserved for some LV7 Digimons such as Omegamon, Diaboromon and Milleniummon. There is no one particular trait or playstyle for white, and it mostly depends on the archetype you are playing instead. 

Conclusion

Some colors can be more popular than others in the meta, and the meta will always be changing. If you are building a competitive deck, be sure to check out our decklists. Otherwise, play the digimons you’ve always fancied!
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